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Adriano Manocchia named Official Conservation Artist

Ronald G. Dodson, Chairman of ISC-Audubon announced today that Adriano Manocchia has been named the Official Conservation Artist of ISC-Audubon. Through this position with the not-for-profit ISC-Audubon, Manocchia will be working with the organization to generate awareness of the importance of conservation oriented landscape management at home, work and at play.

Dodson said, “As Official Conservation Artist”, Manocchia will contribute through his art in raising awareness for the ISC-Audubon Adriano-fishing-2-low-resConservation Landscapes for America initiative, which is aimed at motivating people to become personally engaged in conservation and sustainability where they live, work, and play.

“We are very excited and honored that Adriano has agreed to become associated with our organization”, comments Mr. Dodson.

Manocchia said, “I first met and collaborated with Ron when he was working with the National Audubon Society and later with the Audubon Society of New York State. We lost connection for several years but I am very pleased to have now reconnected with Ron. I'm very supporting of the efforts he is now spearheading through ISC-Audubon and I’m honored to contribute to their success through my artistic vision.”

Dodson and Manocchia worked together with the support of the United States Golf Association (USGA) in the past to produce a series of golf related art that featured some of the top conservation oriented golf course facilities in the country. Dodson said that the present role that Manocchia will fill, will not only include golf conservation, but will feature artwork of other subjects including waterscapes, sporting art, wildlife and landscapes. His work captures some of the most magnificent conservation efforts in America.

Manocchia, a New Yorker who has been a full time painter for the last thirty years, is perhaps best known for his sporting art. His paintings have been displayed at such prestigious venues as the American Museum of Fly Fishing in Manchester, Vermont. In June, 1997, the Catskill Fly Fishing Museum in Livingston Manor, New York exhibited Manocchia's work, along with the work of artist Mark Susinno, in a show called Above and Below. Manocchia also has often focused his attention on wildlife, especially the North American mammals that share his own watery and wooded habitat: moose, deer and wolves.

ISC-Audubon and Ronald G. Dodson

ISC-Audubon is a not-for-profit education and advocacy organization committed to encouraging people to practice conservation and sustainability where they live, work and play.

Ronald G. Dodson is a wildlife biologist and natural resource planner who has worked for over 35 years in the conservation field. Dodson has authored a number of books and publications on wildlife management, sustainability and has created a number of award winning conservation and certification programs. As Chairman of ISC-Audubon Dodson leads the conservation and policy development efforts of ISC-Audubon.

Adriano Manocchia Bio: http://adriano-art.com 

Adriano Manocchia, born in New York in 1951, began a career in photo-journalism while completing his BA degree for literature from Pace University in New York. Upon completion of college, Adriano ran his own photo/film agency covering events for television and print media. His work has taken him aboard the aircraft carrier Nimitz, on mid-air refueling missions, on the Goodyear Blimp, and on numerous assignments to the White House.

In 1983, Adriano began spending his free time painting. A year later he decided to undertake this new challenge full time. Through his art, he has supported Ducks Unlimited, Atlantic Salmon Federation, Trout Unlimited, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, American Cancer Society and the Special Olympics. His limited edition prints - Giant Panda and Snow Leopard - were endorsed by the National Zoo in Washington and the New York Zoological Society. A Bald Eagle painting was chosen to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the Constitution by the U.S. Bicentennial Committee, with the image reproduced on a poster and collector plate. Adriano's work helped raise over $250,000 for Ducks Unlimited through their Sponsor Print Program from 1990 to 1992. He participated in the North Atlantic Ducks Unlimited Flyway Artist program in 1991 and 1992 and was N.Y. Audubon Society Earth Day artist in 1993. He was selected Artist of the Quarter in 1991 and 1995 for the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and sponsor artist in 1992 and 1996. Several of his paintings were featured in the hardcover collector's book Fine Art of Georgia's Fairways. His art has appeared on the NBC Today Show, State Of the Art, and Woods n' Water TV Show. His work has been widely published both in Europe and the United States.

Adriano's paintings won the prestigious OWAA/DuPont Art Award in 1989 through 1991. His work has appeared in Gray's Sporting Slow-Drift-12-x-24Journal, Flyfishing, Fly Rod & Reel, Collector Editions, Outdoor Life, Premiere (Monte Carlo), Wildlife Art, Conservationist, Pescare (Italy), Flyfishing Quarterly, Bugle, U.S. Art, Sporting Classics, and Flyfisher (Japan). Following a sold out show at the American Museum Of Fly Fishing in Manchester, Vermont in 1992, Adriano traveled to Europe to introduce his work and was the featured artist at the 8th Annual International Fishing Expo in Verona, Italy. In 1997 his paintings were featured at a retrospective sporting art show at the National Museum of Wildlife Art in Jackson, Wyoming, in a one-man show at Trailside Galleries in Jackson Hole, and at the Catskill Fly Fishing Museum in Livingston Manor, New York, in a two-man show entitled "Above and Below". In 2000 he was featured in the J.N. Bartfield Galleries catalog and at an Artist Showcase exhibit at Trailside Galleries.

In the United States his oils are shown at J.N. Bartfield Galleries (New York City), Trailside Galleries (Jackson, Wyoming and Scottsdale, Arizona), Broadway Gallery (Alexandria, Virginia), John Collette Fine Art (Highland, North Carolina), Zantman Art Galleries (Sun Valley and Ketchum, Idaho), The Sporting Gallery (Middleburg, Virginia), the Sporting Life Gallery (Beaver Creek, Colorado), and Montana Trails Gallery (Bozeman, Montana).

Awards & Distinctions

Save The Sound - Official Poster Artist, 1987

Panda Conservation Research/Smithsonian - Print Artist, 1987

Snow Leopard Project/NY Zoological Society, Print Artist, 1987

Kentucky Trout Stamp Competition - Hon. Mention, 1988

Maine Sportsman's Show Wildlife Art - 1st, Hon. Mention, 1989

Official Artist of the Bicentennial of the U.S. Constitution, 1989

OWAA/DuPont Art Contest - 1st & 2nd: 1990, 1st: 1989,'91

Sportsman's Alliance of Maine - Sponsor Artist, 1989,'90,'91

Official N.Y. Audubon Earth Day Artist, 1990

N.Y. Ducks Unlimited - Sponsor Print Artist, 1990,'91,'92

Atlantic Salmon Federation - Special Poster Artist, 1990

Collector Editions Award Of Excellence Nominee, 1990-1994

FFF N.E. Council - Artist of The Year Award, 1991

Rocky Mt. Elk Foundation Artist of the Quarter, Summer 1991

Animal In Art Exhibit - Hon. Mention, Merit Award, 1991

Rocky Mt. Elk Foundation - Premier Sponsor Artist, 1991, 1995

National DU Flyway Program - Selected Print Artist, 1991

Wetlands America - Official Artist, 1991

OWAA Annual Conference - Featured Artist, 1991

New England DU - Sponsor Print Artist, 1992

AIPO Intern. Fishing Expo, Italy - Featured Artist/Poster, 1992

Art For The Embassy Program - Selected Artist, 1992-1995

Collections

Pitman Company Collection, Totowa, New Jersey

Tudor Farms Collection, Cambridge, Maryland

Fly Fishing Federation Museum, Livingston, Montana

Paul Jones Collection, Isla Morada, Florida

National Park of Abruzzi Museum, Italy

U.S. Embassy, Ankara, Turkey

U.S.G.A Headquarters, Far Hills, New Jersey

Shadow Hawk Golf Club, Houston, Texas

PGA Tour Headquarters, Ponte Vedra, Florida

Precision Valve Collection, Yonkers, New York

American Museum of Fly Fishing, Manchester, Vermont

IGFA Museum Headquarters, Florida

Catskill Fly Fishing Museum, Livingston Manor, New York

SustainAbility Newsletter Archive Article (random)

Critter of the Season - The Sandhill Crane

Sandhill Cranes at the PGA Golf VillageAdults are gray overall; during breeding, the plumage is usually much worn and stained, particularly in the migratory populations, and looks nearly ochre. The average weight of the larger male is 4.57 kg (10.1 lb), while the average weight of females is 4.02 kg (8.9 lb), with a range of 2.7 to 6.7 kg (6.0 to 15 lb) across the subspecies. The Sandhill Crane has a red forehead, white cheeks and a long dark pointed bill. Its long dark legs trail behind in flight, and the long neck is kept straight in flight. Immature birds have reddish brown upperparts and gray underparts. The sexes look alike. Size varies among the different subspecies. The standard linear measurements of the Sandhill are: the wing chord measures 41.8–60 cm (16.5–24 in), the tail is 10–26.4 cm (3.9–10.4 in), the exposed culmen is 6.9–16 cm (2.7–6.3 in) long and the tarsus measures 15.5–26.6 cm (6.1–10.5 in).

This crane frequently gives a loud trumpeting call that suggests a French-style "r" rolled in the throat, and they can be heard from a long distance. Mated pairs of cranes engage in "unison calling." The cranes stand close together, calling in a synchronized and complex duet. The female makes two calls for every single call of the male.

The sandhill crane's large wingspan, typically 1.65 to 2.1 m (5.4 to 6.9 ft), makes this a very skilled soaring bird similar in style to hawks and eagles. Utilizing thermals to obtain lift, they can stay aloft for many hours, requiring only occasional flapping of their wings and consequently expending little energy. With migratory flocks containing hundreds of birds, they can create clear outlines of the normally invisible rising columns of air (thermals) that they ride.

Behavior and Breeding
Sandhill cranes are fairly social birds that are usually encountered in pairs or family groups through the year. During migration and winter, non-related cranes come together to form "survival groups" which forage and roost together.

In migratory populations, egg-laying usually begins between early April and late May. Both members of a breeding pair build the nest using plant material from the surrounding areas. Nest sites are usually in marshes, bogs, or swales, though cranes will occasionally nest on dry land. 

The parents brood the chicks for up to 3 weeks after hatching. They feed the young intensively for the first few weeks, and with decreasing frequency until they reach independence at 9 or 10 months old.

The chicks remain with their parents until 1 or 2 months before the parents begin laying the next clutch of eggs. After leaving their parents, the chicks form nomadic flocks with other subadults and non-breeders. They remain with these flocks until they form breeding pairs themselves, and begin breeding between the ages of 2 and 7 years old.

Status and conservation
Though the Sandhill Crane is not considered threatened as a species, the three southernmost subspecies are quite rare. While the migratory birds could at least choose secure breeding habitat, the resident populations could not, and many subpopulations were destroyed by hunting or habitat change. However, initially the Greater Sandhill crane proper suffered most from persecution; by 1940 probably fewer than 1,000 birds remained. They have since increased greatly again, though with nearly 100,000 individuals they are still less plentiful than the Lesser Sandhill Crane, which numbers over 400,000 individuals, making the species the most plentiful crane alive today.

The Florida Sandhill Crane is far less common, with some 5,000 individuals remaining. They are most threatened by habitat destruction and probably depend on human management in the long run. In Florida, it is protected, and if killed, carries a very high monetary penalty. This subspecies is under protection of state and federal law at this time. Since the loss of habitat is a somewhat controllable cause of a declining population, habitat preservation is a valuable management measure. The current outlook for the Florida sandhill crane, if it can be maintained on the protected habitats, is good. Transplanting wild birds, as well as introducing captive-reared birds into suitable areas where crane numbers are low, appears to be a viable technique in the management of this threatened species. It is hoped that these management strategies, plus continued ecological research, will prevent the Florida sandhill crane from reaching a more critical status.

The Mississippi Sandhill Crane has most drastically declined in range; it used to occur along most of the northern Gulf of Mexico coast and its range was at one time nearly parapatric with that of its eastern neighbor (compare the Mottled Duck); today only 25 breeding pairs exist in an intensively managed population, but this seems at least stable in recent times. Some 300 Cuban Sandhill Cranes remain; this is the least-known of the populations.

The Mississippi Sandhill Crane has become the first bird to have a young hatched where an egg was fertilized by a sperm that was previously thawed out from a cryogenic state. This occurred at the Audubon Institute as part of this subspecies' Endangered Species Recovery Plan.

Sandhill Cranes have been used as foster parents for Whooping Crane eggs and young in reintroduction schemes for that species. This project failed as these foster-raised Whooping Cranes imprinted on their foster parents and later did not recognize other Whooping Cranes as their conspecifics – attempting instead, unsuccessfully, to pair with Sandhill Cranes.

 


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References and Sources used in this issue of SustainAbility Newsletter Include:

Audubon Lifestyles
www.audubonlifestyles.org 
             
The International Sustainability Council
www.thesustainabilitycouncil.org 

Sustainable Demonstration Project Blog
scotlandyardsgolf.blogspot.com

The 2012 Summer Olympic Games
www.olympic.org

Scotland Yards Golf Club
www.scotlandyards.com

Audubon Outdoors
www.audubonoutdoors.org

Love and Dodson
www.loveanddodson.com

Green World Parth
www.greenworldpath.com

Turf Feeding Systems
www.turffeeding.com

The Dodson Group
www.thedodsongrp.com      

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A Coalition for Good - Spreading the Seeds of Sustainability

ISC-Audubon is a coalition of non-profit organizations and initiatives that include The International Sustainability Council (ISC), Audubon Lifestyles, Audubon Outdoors, Planit Green, Broadcast Audubon, and the Audubon Network for Sustainability. 

Funds generated through memberships and donations are used to provide fruit & vegetable seeds, wildflower seed mix, and wildlife feed & birdseed to urban and suburban communities around the world. These seeds are used by communities to establish fruit and vegetable gardens, bird and wildlife sanctuaries, and for the beautification of urban and suburban landscapes by creating flower and native plant gardens.

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